All You Need is Less

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4 min read. Minimalism, Personal.

All You Need is Less

Earlier this year we went on an epic honeymoon to Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. My unexpected favorite place we visited during this trip was Luang Prabang, Laos. We were wowed by the people, the culture and the city – which itself is a UNESCO world heritage site.

Aside from exploring beautiful waterfalls, visiting ancient temples and eating delicious amok (fish steamed in bamboo leaves) one thing we enjoyed immensely was the massive night market. Right around dusk, the entire main street of Luang Prabang closes down and is filled in by local vendors spreading out their local wares – usually on a blanket.

Our Visit to a School for the Deaf

There was one day during our trip when minimalism and the idea of living with less hit me as never before during our stay here. It started with a visit our group made to a school for the deaf. That visit inspired this Twitter thread I shared when we returned back to the states (you can read this top to bottom, it’s the entire thread in order).

This exchange stuck with me. Here were a group of mostly orphaned deaf children who’s favorite thing to learn was English, a language they wouldn’t even be able to hear. Learning English would allow them to connect more with the world through television, news, and exported culture. It’s easy for me to forget how powerful it is to know English. Even though it’s the worlds 3rd most spoken language (after Chinese and Spanish), it is a cultural advantage to know, and something I surely take for granted.

 Buddhist Alms Giving Ceremony

One morning while we were in Laos, we woke up early for the Buddhist alms-giving ceremony in town. This is a tradition with deep roots that takes place every morning right around sunrise on the main street of town. The Buddhist Monks of all of the surrounding temples walk along a preset path where kneeling participants (or seated in our case) are waiting to give them a small offering of food.

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Sitting for alms giving.

The offering in our case was a single mouthful of sticky rice that we would carefully put into each monks metal basket. The rice collected will serve as their only meal for the day.

One thing I didn’t expect was the age range for these monks. Most young men of Laos join a monastery to gain an education. Some stay for months, but others end up staying for many years. While I can’t fully imagine what this experience is like, I can say every monk that passed by (regardless of age) seemed more mature than their years let on.

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Monks passing by for alms giving.

It was a humbling, yet quiet ceremony. Here were a group of people consisting on one crowdsourced meal a day with relatively few possessions (although we saw many with iPhones!). For the second time on the trip, I realized my own excess and began to wonder how much less I really needed.

I’d love to try the experience of living in a Buddhist Monastery for a month (#36 on my goals list) but even without that experience, this morning was humbling.

The Night Market

One of the attractions of Luang Prabang is the night market – a series of vendors lining the street. This market starts around sunset every night and fills the area with quiet vendors waiting for customers to come to them. We boarded a tuk-tuk from our hotel and headed to check it out.

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Tuk tuk in Luang Prabang

On the way to the market, we passed one tourist with a t-shirt that stood out to me. It had one simple phrase on it:

All you need is less.

The combined experiences from the last day in Laos, coupled with the Beatles reference (I’m a huge Beatles fan) drove this concept further home for me. One aspect of minimalism that I am drawn to is the idea of living with only what you need – which is usually far less than you think. After our experience at the school and later with the monks, I began to wonder how much do I really need, as opposed to only buying because I’m bored, or unsatisfied with something else in my life?

When I’ve been on the verge of buying something that seems questionable, I think back to this moment. Is this something I need? Is there a path where I would be happier without buying this?

We continued on to the night market, which was amazing to walk through – even if you’re more spectating than shopping. There are food stalls serving any Laos dish you can imagine, clothing vendors selling entire outfits for $5, local alcoholic spirits and more trinkets than you can imagine.

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Night market in Luang Prabang

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Carved elephants in Laos

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These coconut pancakes are seriously one of the most delicious things I've ever eaten.

Primed by our recent experience, we didn’t end up purchasing much in this market – a scarf for our new cold weather, a beautiful skirt for Mrs. Minafi and a little local wine to try. We did eat a bunch of delicious food – our favorite being these warm sweet coconut pancakes. We later looked up a recipe for them and started (attempting) to make them at home.

Would You Be Happier With Less?

When thinking about spending money, whether it’s making the choice between eating out and eating in, buying a new outfit or continuing to wear one in your closet – having a reason to have less can help steer your hand. For me, remembering these moments help bring me back to a focused place. In the same way I am happier after a workout, I’m usually happier after making a decision to live with less.

  1. I’m in SE Asia right now (started in Thailand and went through Cambodia, then now in Vietnam), and have had the same feelings as you. Spending a lot of time with people who are so happy with so little really make you question what we really need. And it also makes me very grateful to have been born in the US. It’s a truly eye-opening experience that many more people need to have.

    PS I also loved fish amok. One of the best things I’ve eaten!

    1. Ohhh, I’m jealous! I already want to go back. 2 weeks was just not enough time. Doing a 6-month mini-travel/retirement would be a much better pace.

  2. As I pare back what I need personally, I can’t help think about how my stock market investments are powered by the excess consumption of others.

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